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jue, 04 ago

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Webinar

"Who knew? Identifying the nasoconchal paranasal sinus of the white rhino".

Join Dr. Mat Gerard as he discusses the road he took to understand the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity anatomy of the rhinoceros, of which many were and still are, sustaining traumatic wounds to this region when poached for their horns.

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"Who knew? Identifying the nasoconchal paranasal sinus of the white rhino".
"Who knew? Identifying the nasoconchal paranasal sinus of the white rhino".

Time & Location

04 ago 2022, 19:00 GMT-4

Webinar

Guests

About the Event

Join Dr. Mat Gerard as he discusses the road he took to understand the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity anatomy of the rhinoceros, of which many were and still are, sustaining traumatic wounds to this region when poached for their horns. Dr. Mathew Gerard is a Teaching Professor of Veterinary Anatomy at NC State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He is a graduate of the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Australia and subsequently completed a large animal internship at Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Canada and then a large animal surgical residency at North Carolina State University. Dr. Gerard is a diplomate of American College of Veterinary Surgeons and has a PhD in Equine Exercise Physiology. Dr. Gerard has primarily worked in academia at NCSU, in the role of clinical large animal surgeon and now as a veterinary anatomy instructor. Dr. Gerard’s research interests have varied over the years with a current focus on clinically applied anatomy research. Projects have included anatomical studies on distal limb nerve blocks in cats and blocking the brachial plexus of Eastern box turtles. An ongoing interest, which began in 2016, is the mapping and describing of the head and limb anatomy of the white rhinoceros. This research was commenced in response to the need to understand the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity anatomy of the rhinoceros, of which many were and still are, sustaining traumatic wounds to this region when poached for their horns.

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